CHS reports net income of $229.3 million for the 3rd quarter of fiscal 2018

CHS income
CHS Inc., the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company, reported net income on July 11, 2018, of $229.3 million for the third quarter of its 2018 fiscal year (three-month period ended May 31, 2018), compared to a net loss of $45.2 million for the same time period a year ago.

Consolidated revenues for the third quarter of fiscal 2018 were $9.0 billion, up from $8.6 billion for the third quarter of fiscal 2017. Pretax income was $289.4 million for the third quarter of fiscal 2018, compared to a loss of $209.2 million for the same period the prior fiscal year.

“Thanks to the hard work of many throughout CHS, we’ve made great strides this year in strengthening relationships, optimizing operations and improving results from our core businesses,” said CHS President and CEO Jay Debertin. “The steps we’ve taken will better position us to navigate the inevitable cycles in agriculture and energy. I am proud of our team and their dedication and commitment to operating with excellence.” (more…)

The difference between drift and volatilization

herbicide application
Getting the most out of an herbicide application not only includes maximizing efficacy, but also minimizing damage caused by herbicides. Being aware of what can go wrong and how to avoid it can lead to effective, on-target herbicide applications and help growers have a successful growing season – without the distress and loss caused by applications gone awry.

Two threats to herbicide applications are drift and volatilization. While they may seem similar, they are quite unique and require different attention to ensure that neither occur. (more…)

June 20th Scouting Report

 

Curious what’s happening throughout our territory?  Members of our agronomy team weigh in below with what they’re seeing in fields so far this season.

Reese Benike Scouting Report
CHS Border States in Browns Valley

Our area has a lot of standing water!  Corn is V7 or larger, and looking really good.  Beans look fairly good in most areas.  There are a few potential soybean nutrient deficiencies that will need to be investigated after things dry up a little bit.

 

Kalyn Henrichs Scouting Report
CHS Border States in Wilmot

In our area, we are currently finishing up spraying corn & beans and fungicide on spring wheat.  There is currently a little bit of bug spraying on alfalfa.  Overall, crops are looking good.  These next couple of weeks, it’ll be time to start scouting for bugs and timing fungicides on wheat.

 

Jared Nordly Scouting Report
CHS Border States in Clinton

Wheat

Wheat is progressing very well.  We are starting to see some of the earlier planted fields heading out this week.  With the early heat this year it has really pushed the wheat plants along quickly and because of this we are noticing much shorter stems on the plants.  The cooler weather this week during heading will be very beneficial in the pollination process.  With the recent wet weather and high humidity, we are finding a fair amount of leaf disease on the lower plant leaves already and highly recommending applying a fungicide to your wheat to protect the flag leaf and prevent scab.  This should be applied within 48 hours of the start of flowering.

Corn

Corn is looking very good in most of our area.  Even with later planting dates, growth is well ahead of last year.  Most corn has had a post-emerge herbicide application and control seems to be very good thanks to good growing conditions.  Given current crop condition and excellent growing conditions, if you are still considering side or top dressing some additional nitrogen, now is the time to get it done.  Research shows that there is no benefit in waiting until after the V8 growth stage to apply additional nitrogen.  Watch weather conditions for the need of future fungicide or insecticide treatments.

Soybeans

Pre-emerge herbicides appear to be working quite well in most cases.  This always brings up the debate of how long I can wait before spraying soybeans.  Even though you may only have a few weeds out there, we recommend getting them sprayed before the weeds that are there exceed 3-4 inches as they become much harder to control after they accede that size.  We recommend tank mixing a residual herbicide with this early application to hold the next flush of weeds down until the soybeans can canopy to shade later flushes out.  Soybeans develop by sunlight vs heat units like most other crops, and normally most soybeans will start to flower around that June 22nd date.  This is another reason we recommend spraying early vs late because most herbicide labels do not recommend spraying after the soybean plant starts to flower.

Keep in mind the deadline in Minnesota for applying labeled dicamba products to Xtend soybeans is June 20th!

Alfalfa

Scout now for Potato leafhoppers in your alfalfa.

June 8th Scouting Report

 

Curious what’s happening throughout our territory?  Members of our agronomy team weigh in below with what they’re seeing in fields so far this season.

 

Lee Sigler Scouting Report
CHS Border States in Clinton

     Corn: Corn has been growing very quickly, so it’s important to spray and get weeds under control before the crop canopies.  (more…)

Encourage your cooperative to apply for Seeds for Stewardship matching grants

Seeds for Stewardship matching grant
Spring and warmer weather are upon us. It’s a great time to plant the seed of community support and grow pride in your community by encouraging your local cooperative to apply for a Seeds for Stewardship matching grant. Since Seeds for Stewardship began in early 2017, CHS has partnered with more than 70 local cooperatives on more than 100 projects in rural communities. Your cooperative could be next!

(more…)

Soil Whisperers

White Hall, Ill., farmer Maria Cox, left, and her crop advisor Kyle Lake were named 2018 4R Advocates by The Fertilizer Institute. Photo by Erin Williams, CHS.

Adapted from C magazine article by Peg Zenk

READ MORE: Find the entire C magazine article here.

Not all risk is bad. While farmers work hard to reduce financial risk, innovators take calculated risks when it comes to new when it comes to new agronomic approaches.

Illinois farmer Maria Cox is one of those innovators. She and her crop advisor, Kyle Lake, with CHS in Carrollton, Ill., were named 2018 4R Advocates by The Fertilizer Institute. Each year, the award recognizes five farmer-retail agronomist teams who are dedicated to implementing the 4Rs of nutrient stewardship: using the right nutrient source, at the right rate, at the right time and in the right place.

In conversations with Cox and others who have actively embraced the 4Rs, common management challenges and strategies emerge. Among all the technologies and tactics they’ve tried, these growers point to strategies that are producing the biggest benefits in terms of soil health and the bottom line. (more…)

Start the New Season with a New Grease

cenex grease

Using the right grease is one of the most important decisions you can make as you prepare equipment for the high-pressure planting season. But recent updates in grease formulations might make you do a double take as you get ready for spring.

“When you put the grease into your grease gun and on bearings, you’re going to notice it looks different,” says Andrew Hamilton, director of technical services and quality for Cenex® lubricants and refined fuels. “That is on purpose. You’re getting a better grease.” (more…)

Anatomy of a grain trade

anatomy of a grain trade infographic

The global grain trading business is risky. Avalanches and mudslides can stop trains in their tracks. Striking union workers can halt grain loading at port. Freezing sea spray and high swells can delay ocean vessels for days. Commodity prices and costs shift constantly.

While those situations may be beyond a grain company’s control, there are countless other factors that a team of CHS experts successfully manages 365 days a year – always focused on efficiency, safety and profitability. (more…)

CHS reports a net income of $346.7 million for the first half of fiscal 2018

CHS income fiscal 2018

 

CHS Inc., the nation’s leading farmer-owned cooperative and a global energy, grains and foods company, today reported net income of $346.7 million for the first half of its 2018 fiscal year (six-month period ended Feb. 28, 2018), compared to net income of $223.7 million for the same time period a year ago.

Consolidated revenues for the first half of fiscal 2018 were $14.9 billion, down from $15.4 billion for the first half of fiscal 2017. Pretax income was $185.0 million and $249.1 million for the first half of fiscal 2018 and 2017, respectively. (more…)

Sisseton School 6th Graders Learn About Agriculture During Ag Day

Students and volunteers of the 2018 Ag Day at the Sisseton Sale Barn

 

With the average American three generations removed from the farm, it’s tough for individuals not involved in the industry to understand all aspects of agriculture.  However, the 6th grade students at Sisseton School now have a good understanding of what it takes to get food on the table, thanks to the Ag Day field trip held Tuesday, March 27th.

Roughly sixty students participated in the Ag Day Tour, where they had the opportunity to experience all aspects of agriculture through demonstrations and sessions put on by area agriculture organizations.  CHS Border States played a big part in the day by hosting students for a 30 minute tour of our agronomy facility.  While here, students were able to see the ‘big rigs’ (AKA our application equipment) tour the fertilizer facility, learn about the seed we plant and the chemistry used to keep them healthy, along with basic fire extinguisher safety training.  Our staff also helped with lunch for the event, filling everyone up on delicious burgers!

Students on the tour visited CHS Border States Board Chairman Dana Stapleton’s farm, where they learned about planting and harvesting equipment from the Stapletons, as well as more about calves and cattle nutrition from the team at Riverview, LLP.  Students also toured the Sisseton Livestock Auction facility.  Back at the school, students participated in sessions where they made their own butter, played Ag Jeopardy and Bingo, identified a balanced diet, and more.

A big thanks to the coordinating committee for providing us the opportunity to participate in this event!  It was a fun day sharing our passion for agriculture with the next generation.

More photos from the day can be found on our Facebook page.

© 2018 CHS Inc.